Play It And Learn


Play It And Learn (PIAL) is a collection of educational games from 1955-1995, that were known for their influence on learning and education, inside and outside the classroom. Some games were explicitly educational; e.g. Oregon Trail, Mavis Beacon's Typing Tool; while others were educational almost by accident; e.g. SimCity, Civilization. We present them here so researchers can analyze them, players can play them, and the play can be measured and queried to accumulate qualitative data on the player's experience and match that to quantitative data from the player's actions. The most useful data may come from comparing results from several versions of the same game, and by looking a person's learning style across a variety of games. Key captures and questionnaires will be as unintrusive as is reasonable.

The following is a template for each game's page. We will strive for commonality so users recognize which part of the museum they are visiting.

Game Name

PIAL play button.png
Hit the button, play the game, add to the data.

The official name, the common name, and the version in the case of series.

Game Description

The official portrayal of the game, the way most folks described it, and links to documentation.

EdTech Significance

Direct effects of intentional and unintentional lessons taught, influence on other projects and people, time, number of players, and distribuition.

Game Play Data

As players play, data will be collected and presented. Privacy and security assurances will be provided.

Bibliography

Links to documentation, analyses, stories, histories, developers' biographies


Play It And Learn

Game NamePIAL play button.png


Game Description


EdTech Significance


Game Play Data


Bibliography


Simulation, History and Computer Games (A Chapter in Cyberhistory: Historical Computer Games and Post-Structuralist Historiography,” in Jeffrey Goldstein and Joost Raessens, Handbook of Computer Games Studies (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2005): 327-338)