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Saturday, February 18

  1. page Alan Kay (deleted) edited
    3:54 pm
  2. page Dynabook edited Dynabook {1200px-Alan_Kay_and_the_prototype_of_Dynabook.jpg} By Marcin Wichary from San Franci…

    Dynabook
    {1200px-Alan_Kay_and_the_prototype_of_Dynabook.jpg} By Marcin Wichary from San Francisco, U.S.A. - Alan Kay and the prototype of Dynabook, pt. 5, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5871599
    ...
    The Personal Computer for Children of all Ages - Alan Kay, 1972 (pdf)
    The Dynabook of Alan Kay - history-computer.com
    Alan Kay - HCLE wiki
    (view changes)
    3:54 pm

Friday, February 17

  1. page Alan_Kay_pioneer edited ... "In short, PARC's prominence, its large number of visitors, the diffusion of its staff, a…
    ...
    "In short, PARC's prominence, its large number of visitors, the diffusion of its staff, and the publications it generated, all made it influential in computer science, and-- through more indirect means-- the personal computer and workstation industries in the 1980s."
    Dynabook
    A summary of the Dynabook from history-computer.com's The Dynabook of Alan Kay
    "In 1968 Kay created a very interesting concept—the Dynabook. He wanted to make A Personal Computer For Children Of All Ages—a thin portable computer, highly dynamic device that weighed no more than two pounds The ideas led to the development of the Xerox Alto prototype, which was originally called the interim Dynabook. It embodied all the elements of a graphical user interface, or GUI, as early as 1972. The software component of this research was Smalltalk, which went on to have a life of its own independent of the Dynabook concept."

    Section 2
    Viewpoints Research Institute, a non-profit he founded in 2001 to promote "powerful ideas education" for the world's children.
    (view changes)
    11:32 am
  2. page Dynabook edited Dynabook {1200px-Alan_Kay_and_the_prototype_of_Dynabook.jpg} By Marcin Wichary from San Francis…

    Dynabook
    {1200px-Alan_Kay_and_the_prototype_of_Dynabook.jpg} By Marcin Wichary from San Francisco, U.S.A. - Alan Kay and the prototype of Dynabook, pt. 5, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5871599
    Introduction
    From history-computer.com's The Dynabook of Alan Kay
    "In 1968 Kay created a very interesting concept—the Dynabook. He wanted to make A Personal Computer For Children Of All Ages—a thin portable computer, highly dynamic device that weighed no more than two pounds The ideas led to the development of the Xerox Alto prototype, which was originally called the interim Dynabook. It embodied all the elements of a graphical user interface, or GUI, as early as 1972. The software component of this research was Smalltalk, which went on to have a life of its own independent of the Dynabook concept."
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Main Content
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Miscellaneous
    Section 1
    Section 2
    References
    The Personal Computer for Children of all Ages - Alan Kay, 1972 (pdf)
    The Dynabook of Alan Kay - history-computer.com

    (view changes)
    11:27 am

Thursday, February 16

  1. page Alan_Kay_pioneer edited ... "The PLATO system was created in 1960 at the University of Illinois. Initially it ran as …
    ...
    "The PLATO system was created in 1960 at the University of Illinois. Initially it ran as a one-terminal system connected to the ILLIAC computer. By 1963, the system was running on a CDC 1604 with multiple simultaneous users. By 1972, the system had expanded to run a thousand simultaneous users on a CDC CYBER mainframe. Control Data Corporation began marketing PLATO commercially in 1976, resulting in PLATO system installations in dozens of cities around the world. Many of these systems were interconnected, enabling email and remote logins through the network. For nearly ten years, there were more users on PLATO than there were on ARPANET, the precursor to the Internet."
    XEROX PARC
    He "is onePalo Alto Research Center (PARC)
    From the official PARC About page
    "Since its inception, PARC has pioneered many technology platforms – from the Ethernet and laser printing to the GUI and ubiquitous computing – and has enabled the creation of many industries."
    From Xerox PARC turns 40: Marking four decades
    of tech innovations - Computerworld September 20, 2010
    "For 40 years,
    the earliest pioneersXerox Palo Alto Research Center (commonly called Xerox PARC, now just PARC) has been a place of object-oriented programming, personal computing,technological creativity and bold ideas. The inventions it has spawned, from Ethernet networking to laser printing and the graphical user interfaces".
    (workstations, user interfaces, desktop publishing,
    interface (GUI), have led to myriad technologies that allow us to use computers in ways that we take for granted today.
    When it opened on July 1, 1970, PARC was set up as a division of Xerox Corp. The idea was to invest in PARC as a springboard for developing new technologies and fresh concepts that would lead to future products."
    From Making
    the Ethernet, laser printing,Macintosh - The Xerox PARC Visit - Stanford
    "In short, PARC's prominence, its large number of visitors, the diffusion of its staff,
    and network client-servers.)the publications it generated, all made it influential in computer science, and-- through more indirect means-- the personal computer and workstation industries in the 1980s."
    Dynabook
    Section 2
    (view changes)
    12:26 pm
  2. page Smalltalk edited Smalltalk Introduction ... manipulating text. Section 1 Section 2

    Smalltalk
    Introduction
    ...
    manipulating text.
    Section 1
    Section 2
    (view changes)
    12:11 pm
  3. page Oregon Trail edited Oregon Trail Welcome to the Oregon Trail, or at least the page about the game. Oregon Trail is…

    Oregon Trail
    Welcome to the Oregon Trail, or at least the page about the game. Oregon Trail is an excellent example of how a game is played changes what a player learns. Early versions were typed in by the player. They were necessarily aware of the algorithms creating the experience. Recent versions are conventional software with logic and limitations invisible to the player. In both cases the player will learn about the lives of pioneers. In the earlier versions though, the player also learned programming - and probably frustrations that could mean the game was never played if too many bugs existed. More recent versions may not include programming, but the player is more likely to have unhindered access to the simulation of a pioneer's journey.
    ...
    Oregon Trail - the board game
    Oregon Trail - the play
    The Forgotten History of 'The Oregon Trail,' As Told By Its Creators
    (view changes)
    12:09 pm

Wednesday, February 15

  1. page Smalltalk edited Smalltalk Introduction Smalltalk was a programming language developed by Alan Kay that became …

    Smalltalk
    Introduction
    Smalltalk was a programming language developed by Alan Kay that became the precursor to object-oriented programming, though Alan Kay would challenge that assertion. The goal of the language was to aid educational and constructionist learning by concentrating on a language that wasn't limited to manipulating text.
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Main Content
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Miscellaneous
    Section 1
    Section 2
    References
    A to Z of programming languages: Smalltalk-80
    The Early History of Smalltalk
    Alan Kays Definition Of Object Oriented
    Alan Kay - “Smalltalk” Programming Language
    Videos (YouTube)
    Object-Oriented Programming/ Smalltalk (Part 1 of 3)
    Object-Oriented Programming/ Smalltalk (Part 2 of 3)
    Object-Oriented Programming/ Smalltalk (Part 3 of 3)

    (view changes)
    11:20 am

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